Louisville Army Reserve Sergeant among those helping Afghan refugees resettle in America

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After the fall of Kabul, Afghanistan four months ago, the United States opened eight military bases to help house Afghans who fled their country. The goal was, and still is, to help them resettle in America. The whole process is called Operation Allies. Welcome and it started on August 29th. To date, these bases have helped nearly 50,000 Afghans find homes, and now only around 25,000 refugees remain at military bases. Those who remain are helped by soldiers like the army reserve sergeant. Tyler Lawrence, a Louisville native who is currently stationed at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin. “We make sure everyone is medically fit,” Lawrence said. “May their needs be met and everyone happy and healthy.” In addition to medical care, Lawrence said soldiers are responsible for teaching them English and providing vocational training. A job, he said, makes them feel like heroes. “It makes me extremely happy to be here and to contribute to this mission,” said Lawrence. However, it is work that comes with a sacrifice. Lawrence and his team of medics arrived at Fort McCoy on November 11 and with about 7,000 refugees still there, he said his crew could not leave until next October. Which means he will be missing this Christmas, New Years and his upcoming birthday. “Laurent said.” It’s an easy sacrifice to make when I look at the long term, at the rewards for them and for this country. “Until the mission is complete, he said he There was a lot of work to do, but in the meantime he has a message to his loved ones. A message that he won’t be able to deliver in person this year. “I want to say Merry Christmas to my wife and our daughter,” he said. Lawrence said. “I hope you both have a great vacation.” More than 200 organizations across the country are helping the State Department find communities for Afghan refugees.

After the fall of Kabul, Afghanistan four months ago, the United States opened eight military bases to help house Afghans who fled their country.

The goal was, and still is, to help them resettle in America.

The whole process is called Operation Allies Welcome and started on August 29. To date, these bases have helped nearly 50,000 Afghans find homes, and only around 25,000 refugees remain at the military bases.

Those who remain are helped by soldiers like the army reserve sergeant. Tyler Lawrence, a Louisville native who is currently stationed at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin.

“We make sure everyone is medically fit,” Lawrence said. “May their needs be met and everyone happy and healthy.”

In addition to medical care, Lawrence said soldiers are responsible for teaching them English and providing vocational training. A job, he said, makes them feel like heroes.

“It makes me extremely happy to be here and to contribute to this mission,” said Lawrence.

However, it is a job that comes with a sacrifice.

Lawrence and his team of medics arrived at Fort McCoy on November 11 and with around 7,000 refugees still there, he said his team could not leave until next October. Which means he will be missed on Christmas, New Years and his upcoming birthday.

“It sucks, but at the end of the day I see what I’m doing is giving our guests here a chance to have a bright and great future,” said Lawrence. “It’s an easy sacrifice to make when I look at the long term, at the rewards for them and for this country.”

Until the mission is over, he said there is a lot of work to be done, but in the meantime he has a message for those close to him. A message that he will not be able to deliver in person this year.

“I want to wish my wife and our daughter a Merry Christmas,” Lawrence said. “I hope you both have a good vacation.

More than 200 organizations nationwide are helping the State Department find communities for Afghan refugees.

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